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Fighting


Jim Hall
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How do you reconcile the GPS trying to steer the airplane and the ATC trying to steer the airplane on an IFR flight? They fight each other.
i7-7700k @ 4.2 Ghz, 16 GB DDR4/3000,2280 SSD M.2,Genome II Case,Nvidia GTX 1080 rear exhaust, Samsung 40" HDTV & Two 24" HP side monitors. Redbird Alloy yoke, pedals, and throttle. A single Saitek Instrument Panel and Cessna trim wheel. Klipsch ProMedia 2.1 speakers. Windows 10 64 bit. 58 measured Mbps.
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In real life, you follow ATC instructions, unless it's unsafe, and you may have to go into heading mode and insert ATC's heading (and altitude, and speed) instructions.

 

Obviously, in the sim you do as you wish.

 

Larry N.

As Skylab would say:

Remember: Aviation is NOT an exact Science!

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I almost always fly IFR. When ATC gives an instruction, I turn the NAV/GPS switch to the NAV position, turn on Heading Hold on the A/P and let the A/P make the turn. When ATC is happy and says "Resume own Navigation", I turn off Heading Hold and flip the NAV/GPS back to GPS.

Still thinking about a new flightsim only computer!  ✈️

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Thank you, Larry.
i7-7700k @ 4.2 Ghz, 16 GB DDR4/3000,2280 SSD M.2,Genome II Case,Nvidia GTX 1080 rear exhaust, Samsung 40" HDTV & Two 24" HP side monitors. Redbird Alloy yoke, pedals, and throttle. A single Saitek Instrument Panel and Cessna trim wheel. Klipsch ProMedia 2.1 speakers. Windows 10 64 bit. 58 measured Mbps.
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I'll do the same, thank you.
i7-7700k @ 4.2 Ghz, 16 GB DDR4/3000,2280 SSD M.2,Genome II Case,Nvidia GTX 1080 rear exhaust, Samsung 40" HDTV & Two 24" HP side monitors. Redbird Alloy yoke, pedals, and throttle. A single Saitek Instrument Panel and Cessna trim wheel. Klipsch ProMedia 2.1 speakers. Windows 10 64 bit. 58 measured Mbps.
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Mr Zippy, Why do you almost always fly IFR? Do you think most IFR rated pilots do the same?
i7-7700k @ 4.2 Ghz, 16 GB DDR4/3000,2280 SSD M.2,Genome II Case,Nvidia GTX 1080 rear exhaust, Samsung 40" HDTV & Two 24" HP side monitors. Redbird Alloy yoke, pedals, and throttle. A single Saitek Instrument Panel and Cessna trim wheel. Klipsch ProMedia 2.1 speakers. Windows 10 64 bit. 58 measured Mbps.
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Mr Zippy, Why do you almost always fly IFR? Do you think most IFR rated pilots do the same?

 

I find it the easiest route and I like being told where to go! More fun flying than trying to be a navigator! The only time I don't use IFR is if sightseeing or looking for something!

Still thinking about a new flightsim only computer!  ✈️

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Why do you almost always fly IFR? Do you think most IFR rated pilots do the same?

 

One reason for filing on most trips even when the weather is good, is that it helps maintain proficiency in most instrument skills (not actual on-the-gauges flight though -- visual lookout is required when weather isn't bad). In real IFR flying (yes, IFR= Instrument Flight Rules, not IMC, or Instrument Meteorological Conditions), whether on the gauges or not, you still must file and accept clearances, follow the flight plan, deal with any STARs or SIDs, fly instrument approaches (unless you cancel IFR or are "cleared for the visual"), and do all the same navigational chores that IFR requires when in IMC.

 

Thus many instrument rated pilots will file IFR on nearly every trip of any length, while there are also a number of them who file IFR mostly when the weather is marginal or bad. Many of those who don't file IFR on a trip, and even a lot of non-instrument rated pilots will ask for flight following*.

 

For local flights, though, they rarely file IFR unless it's for training purposes or unless the weather requires it, perhaps for a flight between two airports in the same metro area.

 

All the above being said, anyone flying at or above 18,000 feet (in the U.S.) -- that's class A airspace -- is required to file IFR, so the airlines (all other jets, too) mostly have to file except on the rare occasion that they don't get that high on the flight.

 


* Flight Following is another service that ATC provides on a time-permitting basis. Flight following is a service provided to a VFR flight and it amounts to calling ATC, asking for FF, and letting them follow you on radar. You will often get traffic advisories, as the controller's time permits, and will have radio contact already established in case you have a problem that needs you to talk to ATC, engine trouble, for example. But unlike filing IFR, you're not obliged to follow ATC instructions (in fact they won't give you instructions) unless you happen to be in airspace requiring an ATC clearance (class B, C, D). FF also makes it easier to get a clearance into those airspaces, since you're already talking to ATC.

 

Larry N.

As Skylab would say:

Remember: Aviation is NOT an exact Science!

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You sound like the typical husband!!:cool::o:p

 

Am there Do that!

 

Michael

 

Thank (middle name) Herman or Frank, I ain't! Sorry for the biblical reference.

Edited by mrzippy

Still thinking about a new flightsim only computer!  ✈️

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